Cam Lo, Quang Tri Province. Phan Thi Hoi bathes her 14-year-old son, Bui Quang Ky. She was exposed to Agent Orange when she was in the North Vietnamese Army during the war.

Nguyen Thanh Hai, 24, with his father, Nguyen Thanh Quang, in the foreground.

Dallas, Texas. Eric Ramsey, 35, who suffers from hydrocephalus and has a deformed foot and hand. A large part of his brain is also missing.

Eric’s father was a Marine during the Vietnam War and was severely wounded by a land mine and exposed to Agent Orange. Eric receives some benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs, but not for Agent Orange.

Twelve-year-old Tran Thi Thang, with her mother, Ngo Thi Sen. Her father was in the North Vietnamese Army during the war and was exposed to Agent Orange.

Fulshear, Texas. Harold Jackson, 62—who suffers from hydrocephalus peripheral neuropathy, skin cancer, and prostate cancer—and his wife, Doe. Jackson was in the army during the Vietnam War and was exposed to Agent Orange.

He receives benefits from Veterans Affairs.

A boy watches TV at Tu Du Hospital, in Ho Chi Minh City.

Highland Lake, New Jersey. Michael Szymczak, 23—who suffers from spina bifida—and his mother, Doreen Szymczak. Michael’s father was in the Air Force during the Vietnam War and may have been exposed to Agent Orange.

Michael receives benefits from the Veterans Administration, as spina bifida is recognized by the V.A. as a consequence of Agent Orange.

Le Thi Tuyet, 25, with her mother, Pham Thi Manh, and father, Nguyen Van Xuan. The family lived in the area during the war and saw Agent Orange being sprayed.

Greensboro, North Carolina. Rodney Tyler, 58—who suffers from Parkinson’s disease—and his wife, Martie Tyler. Rodney was in the navy during the Vietnam War and was exposed to Agent Orange.

After 21 years of trying to get benefits, he now receives 100 percent disability compensation from Veterans Affairs.

Seventeen-year-old Nguyen Thi Hue, who is blind, with her mother.

Hackettstown, New Jersey. Ryan Albertson, aged six—who suffers from spina bifida—and his father, Kelly Albertson. Ryan’s grandfather James Albertson was in the army in Vietnam during the war and was exposed to Agent Orange.

Ryan does not receive benefits from Veterans Affairs.

Cam Lo, Quang Tri Province. Phan Thi Hoi kissing her 14-year-old son, Bui Quang Ky.

Defiance, Ohio. V.F.W. Post 3360. The U.S. government refuses to award Purple Hearts to Agent Orange victims, so the Order of the Silver Rose, an association of Vietnam veterans, gives medals to vets affected by the chemical.

The Vietnam Friendship Village, outside of Hanoi. A home for disabled war veterans, many of whom have various forms of cancer, diabetes, and skin disease, most likely caused by Agent Orange.

Nine-year-old Nguyen Tuan Thanh’s parents lived in Ben Tre Province, an area heavily sprayed with Agent Orange during the war; his mother has had breast cancer and one of her hands is paralyzed.

Dang Thi Ngoc Giau, 8, with her grandmother Ho Thi Cui.

Truong Minh Hiep, 7, in his crib at Tu Du Hospital, in Ho Chi Minh City.

Children at Tu Du Hospital.

Nguyen Van Thong, 22, who has mental and physical disabilities, crawls beneath the shadow of his brother, Nguyen Van Thuy, who suffers from hydrocephalus and spina bifida.

Their father was exposed to Agent Orange when he served in the North Vietnamese Army.

Source: vanityfair.com